1. Managed to catch Jean Jullien’s first solo show in London this saturday. Allo? runs at Kemistry gallery in shoreditch til the 27th of March, well worth popping by if you’re in London. 

    Always been a huge fan of his work (previous posts here), it’s the sort of clever wit that I really enjoy, as well as a very keen sense of humour. Allo? is full of funny observations about modern life and how we interact with each other in a digital world. It’s not just silly however, do get the feeling of an underlying skepticism or disappointment. Not surprising considering his work is full of smart observations of the world around him, things you would probably miss with your face in your phone all day long!

    You can follow Jean Jullien on tumblr at newsofthetimes.tumblr.com/ a blog of news based editorial illustrations that he runs with two others. Kemistry gallery also have a tumblr at kemistrygallery.tumblr.com/

    Posts about other exhibitions I’ve been to can be found here (been a while but got a few more to write up).

  2. Some of my favorite pieces from the Uniform Wares 12:24 exhibition I went to in Shoreditch a few weeks back.

  3. Exhibition round-up; Malika Favre - Hide and Seek

    I was already a fan of French illustrator Malika Favre before checking out her first solo exhibition in London at the always excellent Kemistry Gallery. Hide and Seek really showcases her style; flat and minimal with lots of black and white, geometric shapes and bright feminine forms. It also has a great narrative as a collection of work, a mysterious woman hiding in a monochrome urban setting. The pictures also link up through this animation produced to promote the exhibition, really nice stuff!

    Definitely recommend going if you can, its on til the 29th September. More info here and prints available here. Also there is a good interview with Malika about the exhibition on the Wallpaper* website.

    Plus you can follow Kemistry Gallery on tumblr to keep up to date with whats on there http://kemistrygalleryblog.tumblr.com/

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    Don’t think I’ve done a personal post in a while! In the last few months I’ve graduated from uni and moved out of Norwich, and now I live in London and am working there as a full time junior designer. Yesterday was a nice sunny Saturday and I did a ridiculous amount of design related things…
Started off at Hewett Street Block Party in Shoreditch, which was really good! Loads of nice stalls and food stands, ate a tasty cheeseburger from Elliot’s and possibly the best ice cream ever courtesy of Sorbitium Ices. There was also an exhibition there called Eat Everything, a collection of food related work curated by Belly Kids and hosted by Protein (who are very interesting and have a lot of varied content on their site).
This was followed by a few exhibitions which I will probably blog about fully in the next few days; Uniform Wares 12:24, the Graphic Design Walk exhibition at 71a. Malika Favre - Hide & Seek at Kemistry Gallery and last but not least Dominic Wilcox at KK Outlet.
On any other saturday this would have been a very productive day but thanks to London Design Festival more was to come! Walked down to Brick lane to go to Tent / Superbrands at the Truman Brewery. Both were really good, loads of lovely furniture, textiles and product design. Hopefully I’ll be able to find some of them online to blog about.
After this was much walking, first to the Exmouth coffee company in Aldgate then the London Book Art Fair at the Whitechapel gallery next door. Then through the mainly empty city, across the river to Borough market, then to Tate Modern to check out the new ‘The Tanks’ section they have opened, a must see for concrete lovers (pics here). The last exhibition of the day was Designers Block at the Southbank, for yet more furniture and nice things. Best of all was a Y shaped 3 way table tennis table outside the entrance! 

    Don’t think I’ve done a personal post in a while! In the last few months I’ve graduated from uni and moved out of Norwich, and now I live in London and am working there as a full time junior designer. Yesterday was a nice sunny Saturday and I did a ridiculous amount of design related things…

    Started off at Hewett Street Block Party in Shoreditch, which was really good! Loads of nice stalls and food stands, ate a tasty cheeseburger from Elliot’s and possibly the best ice cream ever courtesy of Sorbitium Ices. There was also an exhibition there called Eat Everything, a collection of food related work curated by Belly Kids and hosted by Protein (who are very interesting and have a lot of varied content on their site).

    This was followed by a few exhibitions which I will probably blog about fully in the next few days; Uniform Wares 12:24, the Graphic Design Walk exhibition at 71a. Malika Favre - Hide & Seek at Kemistry Gallery and last but not least Dominic Wilcox at KK Outlet.

    On any other saturday this would have been a very productive day but thanks to London Design Festival more was to come! Walked down to Brick lane to go to Tent / Superbrands at the Truman Brewery. Both were really good, loads of lovely furniture, textiles and product design. Hopefully I’ll be able to find some of them online to blog about.

    After this was much walking, first to the Exmouth coffee company in Aldgate then the London Book Art Fair at the Whitechapel gallery next door. Then through the mainly empty city, across the river to Borough market, then to Tate Modern to check out the new ‘The Tanks’ section they have opened, a must see for concrete lovers (pics here). The last exhibition of the day was Designers Block at the Southbank, for yet more furniture and nice things. Best of all was a Y shaped 3 way table tennis table outside the entrance! 

  5. Today I went to the David Shrigley exhibitionBrain Activity at the Hayward Gallery at the Southbank Centre. Really enjoyed it! Lots of great drawings and animations I hadn’t seen before, as well as sculptures, some of which I liked more than others. But overall a great exhibition, lots of things that made me smile, it’s on until the 13th of May.

    Oh and my favourite animation from the show is on youtube, give it a watch. I love it!

  6. I’m in London til Tuesday, today I checked out the exhibition at Kemistry Gallery - Mr T: The Posters of Jerzy Treutler. (More info here where I got the pictures from too) 

    Great little exhibition, lots of very nice posters! If you don’t know about the Polish poster school of design It’s a very interesting genre, artists had a real freedom in their designs and developed a quite unique style that sometimes borrowed from European Modernism but was often totally different. The film posters are especially fascinating because they relied on mainly abstract graphic elements rather than the photography that dominated movie posters in the west.

    The exhibition runs until 17th of March, and the gallery is on Charlotte Road, Shoreditch. Other things worth checking out in the vicinity are the YCN shop round the corner on Rivington Street, and KK Outlet down the road in Hoxton Square.

  7. The third and final exhibition I went to in London on friday was Cut It Out by Noma Bar at Outline Editions on Berwick Street in Soho. Its on til the 30th of September and there is a workshop with the artist on the 24th as well.

    You will probably know or recognise the work of Noma Bar. He has taken clever use of negative space and made it his own! Total mastery and these are no different, a series of brilliant two in one images. A big part of the work is that they can be cut out of different things, any sort of paper or anything thin enough to be cut through easily.

    The focal point of the exhibition is a giant black 3d model of his dog illustration, which is actually a machine that creates your own Noma Bar cut out. I didn’t get to see it in action but its a great idea, you can read more about it here and see more exhibition pictures here.

  8. After The Burgermat Show I went to Kemistry gallery on Charlotte Road in the heart of Shoreditch for their Alan Fletcher exhibition Mind over Matter. Its in honour of the tenth anniversary of the publishing of his seminal book The Art of Looking Sideways. If you don’t own this book then buy it! A giant book full of clever design, intelligent writing and interesting quotes, It’s definitely not just a book for designers id recommend it to anyone.

    The exhibition contained the original plans for a lot of the pages of the book, mainly collaged and handwritten its an interesting look into how he designed and planned out an entire huge book without using a computer. There is aso some prints of his work, and some of his original collages that he use to make out of general ephemera. Oh and theres a photo of the great man himself in his studio on the entire back wall.

    Kemistry Gallery is definitely one of the best places in London to see great design! Recent exhibitions have been from other design legends like Saul Bass and Lou Dorfsman, and they often have amazing contemporary design too.

    (Images Via)

  9. The Burgermat Show is a collaboration of 24 artists, illustrators and designers who all created work around a single theme; the burger! The finished pieces were printed up as placemats and used in an exhibition/burgerfest. It was all planned and organised by my favorite burger blogger Burgerac

    I managed to see an exhibition of all the images on friday at Beach, just off Brick Lane. Really enjoyed it, but of course I would, it combines 2 thing I love! Some of my favorite illustrators were involved in the project too, you may recognise a few of them from previous posts. To see who created the images above, as well as the other 15 burgermats have a look here

    You can buy A2 prints of them all at Print-Process

    (On a side note I had an awesome burger later on in the day, at Kua ‘Aina just off Carnaby Street in Soho. Would definitely recommend it, great value and very tasty!)

  10. The Hand Written Letter Project is an ongoing project since 2007, by designer Craig Oldham. It is a reaction against the depersonalisation of correspondance in the modern world. Craig writes a handwritten letter to a member of the design world and requests a handwritten reply. So far he has received replies from some really big names, such as Milton Glaser, Bob Gill, Michael Bierut, WIm Crouwel and Daniel Eatock among others, as well as top people from many of the worlds biggest design studios. 

    Its a really interesting project, both the idea of it, and the visual aspects of seeing so many designers and studios letterheads, as well as what and how they write (or draw). Reminds me a bit of Letterheady, but with more design legends!

    My sister knew Craig when she was at uni, and showed me his site a few years a go. It has always stuck in my mind as a really impressive site full of great work and interesting, inspiring projects! This handwritten project is exactly the sort of thing that gets your name out there and impresses the design world, and now there is an exhibition of it at KK Outlet in Hoxton, and a book you can buy for £25 and four pounds postage to the UK. Not bad for something that probably started out as just a fun idea! 

    The above selection of letters are just a few I picked, have a look here for way more.

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    CLEAR YOUR HEAD EVERY DAY

    Anthony Burrills solo exhibition at Outline Editions, I went last Friday and its on for the next ten days in Soho.

    Images via here & here

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    Some thoughts on Wim Crouwel;
The Design Museum exhibition has been a real celebration of Wim Crouwel, and all the articles  written about it have probably made him higher in the consciousness of young designers like myself, previously I knew a bit about him but not that much. 
Now Wim Crouwel is most definitely a modernist designer, personally I appreciate modernism, but I don’t get especially excited by it. However I think that Crouwels ‘Total Design’ Dutch modernism is a bit more interesting than the Swiss variety of the time. It’s a bit less cold and feels more passionate, looking at his body of work you can tell modernism was his life, from his photos of modernist architecture to the clothes he’s wearing above. And this got me thinking, to have been growing up when he did modernism must have seemed so exciting and futuristic, so it is little wonder it’s so engrained in his work.
His work has held up to the test of time, it iss still exciting and it still, to me feels futuristic in a weird way. It is intrinsically linked to an imagined modernist future, one that will no longer come true but still feels futuristic. In the same way that If I were to watch Star Wars, the technology looks futuristic, even though modern technology is a totally different and more evolved style. Im not sure if this opinion is being influence by the Sci-Fi exhibition I visited the evening before. But seriously look at the picture of Wim, he looks like he has beamed down to earth from the future but it’s the future that never happened, the future that we could have been living right now.
All this got me thinking, Wim grew up on mainland Europe when Modernism was at its most exciting, I grew up in Birmingham, a city that at times shows all the failures of modernism, architecture that has aged very badly and is oppressively grey, dull and ugly. Nowadays with my design literate eyes I can look at the buildings and appreciate what they were in their day and know they were an improvement, but they are not looking good today. I think it could be this that makes me less keen on modernism, I’ve grown up around its failures. Wim however grew up around its successes and his work is a success itself, even today. Unlike its architecture I think modernist graphic design remains very fresh. But that could a benefit of being ink on paper rather than an entire building thats subject to change due to its environment.
I should probably say some more about his work, I really love Crouwels typographic explorations. His typeface used of the Hiroshima poster is so compact and striking, it still feels very unique. And a lot of his typography is very forward thinking, his New Alphabet is readable but entirely radical and very clever, and often his typography looks like early computer and pixel experiments, but it was years before its time!
Overall great exhibition, a great designer and it really got me thinking about modernism. 
If you want to read more look here, here and here
Images Via

    Some thoughts on Wim Crouwel;

    The Design Museum exhibition has been a real celebration of Wim Crouwel, and all the articles  written about it have probably made him higher in the consciousness of young designers like myself, previously I knew a bit about him but not that much. 

    Now Wim Crouwel is most definitely a modernist designer, personally I appreciate modernism, but I don’t get especially excited by it. However I think that Crouwels ‘Total Design’ Dutch modernism is a bit more interesting than the Swiss variety of the time. It’s a bit less cold and feels more passionate, looking at his body of work you can tell modernism was his life, from his photos of modernist architecture to the clothes he’s wearing above. And this got me thinking, to have been growing up when he did modernism must have seemed so exciting and futuristic, so it is little wonder it’s so engrained in his work.

    His work has held up to the test of time, it iss still exciting and it still, to me feels futuristic in a weird way. It is intrinsically linked to an imagined modernist future, one that will no longer come true but still feels futuristic. In the same way that If I were to watch Star Wars, the technology looks futuristic, even though modern technology is a totally different and more evolved style. Im not sure if this opinion is being influence by the Sci-Fi exhibition I visited the evening before. But seriously look at the picture of Wim, he looks like he has beamed down to earth from the future but it’s the future that never happened, the future that we could have been living right now.

    All this got me thinking, Wim grew up on mainland Europe when Modernism was at its most exciting, I grew up in Birmingham, a city that at times shows all the failures of modernism, architecture that has aged very badly and is oppressively grey, dull and ugly. Nowadays with my design literate eyes I can look at the buildings and appreciate what they were in their day and know they were an improvement, but they are not looking good today. I think it could be this that makes me less keen on modernism, I’ve grown up around its failures. Wim however grew up around its successes and his work is a success itself, even today. Unlike its architecture I think modernist graphic design remains very fresh. But that could a benefit of being ink on paper rather than an entire building thats subject to change due to its environment.

    I should probably say some more about his work, I really love Crouwels typographic explorations. His typeface used of the Hiroshima poster is so compact and striking, it still feels very unique. And a lot of his typography is very forward thinking, his New Alphabet is readable but entirely radical and very clever, and often his typography looks like early computer and pixel experiments, but it was years before its time!

    Overall great exhibition, a great designer and it really got me thinking about modernism. 

    If you want to read more look here, here and here

    Images Via

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    Out of This World: Science Fiction but not as you know it

    Totally forgot to post about this exhibition I visited on my first day in London, last Wednesday. Its at the British Library near Euston, its free! Runs until the 25th of September and I really think its worth popping into. 

    It has a history of Science Fiction split into all the various genres and themes, and explores its crossover into fantasy and horror as well as its influences on real science and how the imagined future matches up with the world of today. I like reading fiction occasionally but Im not a big Sci-fi fan, however I still found it fascinating. It was equally interesting to me as a designer, artists and designers just as much as writers helped create a vision of the future and its amazing to see how people imagined the future to be. Also there are a lot of great book and magazine covers in the exhibition, ranging from a much older victorian style of design, through to modernism and then the 50’s or 60’s retro style that is very much associated with the genre. 

    More info here and on the eye blog here

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    Goodies from the Design Museum shop! 2 Saul Bass postcards, 2 Wim Crouwel postcards and a Mariscal postcard. Plus a State of the Obvious pen and oyster card wallet, designed by Mash Creative. Not really into white helvetica on black but I couldn’t resist! Such a great shop at the design museum, could have bought way more!  

    Goodies from the Design Museum shop! 2 Saul Bass postcards, 2 Wim Crouwel postcards and a Mariscal postcard. Plus a State of the Obvious pen and oyster card wallet, designed by Mash Creative. Not really into white helvetica on black but I couldn’t resist! Such a great shop at the design museum, could have bought way more!  

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    Design Museum London

    30th June 2011

    designmuseum.org

    photos from my flickr

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